Portrait of Student Athletes

Kenli Herrera, Sports reporter

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  Wake up. Go to school. Eat lunch. Work some more. Go to practice. Go home. Study.  Do homework. Go to bed. Repeat. Such is the life of a student-athlete. Many kids in highschool repeat this routine day after day because they are student-athletes. Many have to juggle school, sports, social life, and maybe even a job. Student-athletes are amazing because of the dedication that they put into both school and sports. Some students even play multiple sports taking an even bigger toll on their social and school lives. 

  Gloria Lee is a student-athlete who puts hard work into everything she does. Lee is a sophomore who plays volleyball and tennis. She contributes to the volleyball team with her positive attitude and her outstanding skills. Another student-athlete at Mountain View High School is Ainsley Wilson. Wilson participates in three varsity sports. She does Volleyball, basketball, and soccer. As well as participating in school sports Wilson does club soccer. While playing multiple sports she also maintains a high G.P.A. Last but not least, is AnnaGrace Harris who is an outstanding student-athlete who participates in track and also has a job. Harris works at Chick-Fil-A and keeps a 4.0-grade point average.

  School for many student-athletes is often more important than sports. Harris said, “School is more important because school, in the long run, is what determines my pathway for life.” While school may be more important most student-athletes also believe that sports affect their grades. Student-athletes have a lot of time taken away from their evenings that could be used for studying or doing homework. To get all her work in on time Lee often stays up late to get it done. She said, “I have to stay up late to finish and come in during PRIDE to check-in and make sure I didn’t miss anything.” Being a student-athlete is also about being responsible for everything you have to get done, like practice and assignments while also managing a social life.

  Having a social life is a very important part of a high schooler’s life. Social lives are often hindered by a student-athletes schedule. Wilson said, “Since I’m always busy I don’t have much time to hang out and do fun things.” While sports can harm a student’s social life, the effect can also be positive. Harris said, “I think sports affect my social life in more of a positive way just because I get to meet more people from all grades, and it makes my time more enjoyable.” So while sports may affect your social life negatively they can also improve a student’s social life because of all the new people they get to meet.

 In conclusion, student-athletes are very driven people who work hard all the time to accomplish everything that they want to. With school, sports, social life, and maybe even a job a student-athlete requires preservation to do it all. Wake up. Go to school. Eat lunch. Work some more. Go to practice. Work hard. Go home. Study.  Do homework. Go to bed. Repeat. Such is the life of a student-athlete.